Oregon Whistleblower Laws

by Joel Christiansen on March 31, 2013

Oregon has several so-called whistleblower protections under state law. Whistleblowing violations occur when an employer takes an adverse action against a covered individual because he or she engaged in a protected activity.

Here is a list of some relevant Oregon statutes that provide whistleblower protections to Oregon employees:

  • ORS 659A.199 prohibits employers from taking adverse employment actions against an employee because the “employee has in good faith reported information that the employee believes is evidence of a violation of a state or federal law, rule or regulation.”
  • ORS 653.060 and ORS 652.355 protect employees who make wage claims or provide testimony regarding wage claims.
  • ORS 659A.030(1)(f) prohibits an employer from retaliating against any employee because that employee has opposed any unlawful practice, or because that other person has filed a complaint, testified or assisted in any proceeding under ORS Chapter 659A or has attempted to do so.
  • ORS 654.062 protects employees from retaliation due to reporting health and safety issues at the workplace.
  • ORS 659A.230 prohibits employers from taking adverse employment actions against an employee because the employee has in good faith:
    • caused a complainant’s information or complaint to be filed against any person,
    • cooperated with any law enforcement agency conducting a criminal investigation,
    • brought a civil proceeding against an employer, or
    • testified at a civil proceeding or criminal trial
  • ORS 659A.233 prohibits employers from taking adverse employment actions against an employee because the employee has in good faith:
    • reported possible healthcare violations; or
    • testified at an unemployment hearing
  • ORS 659A.236 protects employees who have “testified before the Legislative Assembly or any of its interim or statutory committees, including advisory committees and subcommittees thereof, or task forces.”
  • ORS 659A.200 et seq. provides various protections for public employees who make protected disclosures.

In addition to these statutes, there are a wide variety of other laws that provide protection to select types of employees. Please be advised that the above-listed statutes and rules are informational only. Since laws are always changing and will apply differently in different situations, you are encouraged to contact an attorney for help with any particular concerns.